mordicai caeli (mordicai) wrote,
mordicai caeli
mordicai

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black brimstone weapons.

the thing that i thing speaks most highly of science-fiction is that a good sci-fi novel has to be plausible. science-fiction writers have to be aware of it. you can set down whatever parameters you want for the universe, but once they are there, you have to stick to them & respect them. this works for characters, too- if you violate a character's personality, you might as well junk the whole thing. it works for everything else, but when i read "fiction" i often see plausibility thrown out the window. lethem is a prime example- all of a sudden the girl is crying rape without cause? or what have you. science-fiction, on the other hand, must be aware of plausibility, due to the nature of the medium. that lovely suspension of disbelief must be earned.

original star trek works like this: we buy that these are episodic morality plays. fine. sure, disembodied brains rule this planet, sure, this week we meet black n' white cookie men, this week children are all thats left on a world. throw whatever you want in the mix- if you are watching star trek, you buy it. but man, misconstrue a character & you will hear about it forever. spock wouldn't do this, kirk would do that. this is why the later treks blow so bad- completely abandon continuity & you violate the plausibility "prime directive." & you wanna see some real fucking great work with plausibility? dune. which is why that book rules, & also why the sequels all blow. he sets up a world, knocks it down, but then when it comes to a second novel, he just tramples all over what we accepted about the world, & the characters.
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